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Social Media It's on Their Terms

In the wake of the new Facebook policy/guidelines, I've seen a lot of people posting a copyright/privacy disclaimer. Unfortunately this does nothing for you. By continuing to use Facebook, you are agreeing to their terms. The best protection you have is to be careful what you upload/post (as always).

 

http://www.snopes.com/computer/facebook/privacy.asp

Applying to Art Shows Follow the Instructions

When you apply to a gallery or art show, make sure you follow the instructions on the prospectus.

 

Not doing so is disrespectful and may result in your submission being thrown out.

 

Pay attention to the following:

 

  • How to apply (direct submission, Zapp etc)
  • Eligibilty requirements such as residency/location, age, experience
  • media/style accepted
  • image requirements (number of images, file type and image size, labeling/file name)
  • required jury/booth fees
  • submission deadlines

 

 

Fill out your form completely and honestly. Don't leave any required fields blank (or heaven forbid lie) - and if you don't understand something, ask for clarification.

 

More about Applying to Art Shows:

Oops! You're Insured Right?

You Want to Ship What?

How Will it Hang?

Don't Split Your Personality

Give Us Your Best Shot(s)

Get the Right Fit

Do a Background Check

Applying to Art Shows Oops! You're Insured Right?

When you show your artwork, you need to think about insurance. Unfortunately, sometimes items can get broken/damaged during install or evenwhile on display.

 

Some galleries/venues provide insurance for artwork while it is in their possession, but many do not. Make sure you are clear on the insurance policies of the venue.

 

If you need to provide your own insurance speak to a company/agent that is familiar with insuring artist's work and make sure they cover work that is out of your possession for display purposes.

 

Many assume that their homeowner's policy will cover their artwork - it won't. Your standard business policy may apply - but don't count on it.

 

Work that is covered in your studio may not be covered outside of it. You may need a special rider on your policy.

 

There are some policies that provide "wall to wall" coverage. They cover your studio, in transit and in the gallery/venue.

 

Above all, do your research and make sure you are clear on what is and what is not covered.

 

More about Applying to Art Shows

Previous:

You Want to Ship What?

How Will it Hang?

Don't Split Your Personality

Give Us Your Best Shot(s)

Get the Right Fit

Do a Background Check

 

Next: Follow the Instructions

 

Applying to Art Shows You Want to Ship What?

Art Delivery TruckIf you are applying to a gallery show out of town, chances are you will need to ship your work to them.

 

Shipping artwork has it's own set of challenges. There are several facors you'll need to take into account. Most major carriers have pretty good info on their websites. Do a little research online so you can be a bit more prepared.

 

First there's the cost - shipping can be really expensive: weight = $, additionally oversize often costs more. Check out the online rate charts and see what size limitations may apply. Keep in mind that your packing materials will add to both the final weight and final size of your items.

 

Think about insurance - some carriers won't insure "Art". You may choose to go without freight insurance, but then you'll need to decide whether you can tolerate not being compensated if your work is lost or damaged in transit. If you need to insure your work, make sure that the shipping company will actually pay damages on the type of work you are sending.

 

Learn how to package your work properly. Most carriers have guidelines for how things should be packed. I used to receive pieces for a craft gallery and believe me I've seen some pretty funky stuff in regards to improperly packed artwork. Here's the deal - if you pack it improperly and it is damaged in transit, it's your problem - not the shipping company's - regardless of whether it's insured or not. Make sure you follow the carrier's requirements for shipping regarding packing materials, double-boxing, etc.

 

Think about the fragility of the items you wish to send. Some pieces are extremely fragile and may be more subject to damage in transit, no matter how carefully you pack them.

 

Also, keep in mind that in the event that your piece does not sell at the show, it will have to be shipped back to you. You will probably have to foot the bill for the return shipping costs. Check with the venue regarding their policies for return shipments.

 

Some venues do not have storage space for packing materials - this may cause issues. If they are willing to store and re-use your packing, make sure it is sturdy enough for a return trip. It's also not a bad idea to mark your name on it somewhere so your artwork actually has a chance of being returned in your packaging. You may also have to provide a preprinted and/or prepaid return label.

 

Make sure repacking your artwork for return is a fairly straight forward job. If it is difficult to repack, the gallery staff may have trouble with it and you may not be happy with the results.

 

Thinking about shipping before applying to a show may save you from scrambling at the last minute to properly pack your work or being surprised by an exhorbitant freight charge when you go to ship it.

 

More About Applying to Art Shows

Previous:

How Will it Hang?

Don't Split Your Personality

Give Us Your Best Shot(s)

Get the Right Fit

Do a Background Check

 

Next: Oops! You're Insured Right?

Applying to Art Shows How Will it Hang?

Think about ease of installation of artwork you submit for gallery shows...most likely you won't be the one installing it. After all, you don't want your work crashing to the floor because the installation was too difficult for a gallery employee to manage easily.

 

Pay particular attention to weight/size/display limits outlined in the prospectus. They are there for a reason. If you disregard their stated limits, most likely your artwork won't be allowed into the show.

 

Make sure all hangers are secure, bases are stable for display, etc. Remember that you won't be there the whole time to watch over your artwork. The general public will be in and out of the space. Even if its a venue with a strict "do not touch" policy, not everyone listens and accidents do happen. You don't want someone to be able to easily knock your painting off the wall or your sculpture off of its stand.

 

More About Applying to Art Shows

Previous:

Don't Split Your Personality

Give Us Your Best Shot(s)

Get the Right Fit

Do a Background Check

 

Next: Applying to Art Shows - You Want to Ship What?

Applying to Art Shows Don't Split Your Personality

don't split your personalityWhen you are applying to an art show or gallery, submit a unified body of work. You need to show the jury that you have a vision, a voice as an artist. Scattered work in terms of styles/voice makes you look inexperienced. This doesn't mean you can't experiment with your work- it just means that for any particular show you should submit a body of work with a clear focus.

 

Also, when submitting images of several pieces, make sure the images look good together as a group. Sometimes jurors will view each image individually - other times they will view your entire submission at once - you just never know. Make sure that your images read well both individually and as a group.

 

More Tip on Applying to Art Shows:

Previous:

Applying to Art Shows - Give Us Your Best Shot(s)

Applying to Art Shows - Get the Right Fit

Applying to Art Shows - Do a Background Check

 

Next: Applying to Art Shows - How Will it Hang?