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Applying to Art Shows Give Us Your Best Shot(s)

Now that you've found a show/gallery/fair you would like to apply to, it's time to get your images picked out for your submission.

 

Let's face it, the competition to get into quality shows is fierce. You need to put your best foot forward. Professional looking images of your artwork are essential.

 

Look at photos of your art work with a critical eye. Pay particular attention to focus, lighting, and compositon. Choose only shots that make you and your work look professional.

 

Photography skills require practice. And, photographing artwork requires its own special set of skills.

 

On a side note, these days everyone has a camera on their phone/tablet - and some of these devices do have the capability of taking really great pictures. However, just like with regular cameras, the skill of the photographer makes all the difference in the quality of the image.

 

If you have not yet developed the skillset to take professional looking shots of your artwork, you should consider hiring a professional photographer who is well versed in this type of photography.

 

Don't know what constitutes a professional looking image?

 

For standard square or rectangular artwork in two dimensions, it's an image cropped ony to show the artwork - no background peeking through and no frame unless it's an intrinsic part of the piece. It should be evenly lit and and clearly focused.

 

For unusually shaped work and three dimensional art, the work should fill as much of the frame as possible. Again try to get the lighting as even as possible - watch out for hotspots, reflections, and deep shadows. Focus on 3d work can be a bit trickier because you may not be able to get everything to look crisp. Make sure the most important parts are in crisp and that anything not in focus is not distracting.

 

Check out our photo tips for more info.

 

More About Applying to Art Shows

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